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Former SRPMIC President Part of ‘Women and Power’ Scottsdale Museum Art Exhibit

A new exhibit at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (SMOCA) called, "Push Comes to Shove: Women and Power," opened October 1. Photo submitted by Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art

Former Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community President Diane Enos is one of five Arizona women at the heart of a new art exhibit in Scottsdale.

The exhibit, “Push Comes to Shove: Women and Power,” opened October 1 and runs through early January at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (SMoCA). According to the museum, the exhibit is “grounded by the experiences of five women who have held positions of great leadership” and features 19 artists.

The exhibit is a cross-disciplinary collaboration between SMoCA and Arizona State University Intermedia professor Muriel Magenta.

Magenta was Enos’ professor at ASU when Enos earned her bachelor’s degree in fine arts. Enos, who is the director of the Community’s Family Advocacy Center, also has a law degree and has served two terms as SRPMIC president.

Late last year, Magenta asked Enos if she wanted to be part of the art project, and Enos participated as a subject in a question-and-answer session in the spring.

Enos said she answered questions on camera in front of about 25 people, mostly college students, for roughly an hour at ASU’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. Questions were focused on her leadership and life experiences. Each of the five women were interviewed separately, and Enos was the only Native American.

The new exhibit, "Push Comes to Shove: Women and Power," opened October 1 and was inspired by former Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community President Diane Enos and other women who have held positions of leadership. Photo submitted by Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art
“I think for myself, I was able to talk a little bit about how I see things as a Native person, as an O’odham woman,” Enos said. “I know that perspective has to be different.”

The four other women were former Arizona Supreme Court Chief Justice Rebecca White Berch; Barbara Barrett, former U.S. ambassador to Finland and namesake of ASU’s Barrett Honors College; Gloria Feldt, former CEO of Planned Parenthood and faculty member of the ASU School of Social Transformation; and U.S Congresswoman Kyrsten Sinema.

As part of the exhibit, each appears on a video titled “The Influencers.”

The exhibit “explores this vital subject during [a] historical juncture in the U.S. as a woman runs for president as the nominee of a major party,” Magenta said in an email. “The artists’ works challenge women to think about power in their everyday lives and to find ways they can make a difference.”

Enos said she is excited to see the exhibit for the first time when it opens to the public.

“There is a creative aspect to politics, and there is a creative part to lawyering, so being able to see what they do with the concept of female leadership, how they resemble what we talked about and create something, I’m extremely curious,” she said.