background image

A 30-Year Pow-Wow Tradition in Salt River

On November 5 and 6, the Community hosted the pow-wow at the Salt River Baseball Field, near the corner of McDowell and Longmore roads.

For 30 years, the Red Mountain Eagle Pow-Wow has preserved the rich heritage of Native America. Every year since it started, hundreds have traveled across the country to the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community for this event.

On November 5 and 6, the Community hosted the pow-wow at the Salt River Baseball Field, near the corner of McDowell and Longmore roads. This year, a total of $35,000 in prize money was awarded.

Dancers competed in six divisions: Tiny Tots (0-6), Juniors (7-12), Teens (13-17), Junior Adults (18-44), Senior Adults (45-59) and Golden Age (60+). The festivities also included gourd dancing and special contests, such as men’s and women’s fancy spotlight dances and a $5,000 hand-drum contest sponsored by host drum Northern Cree from Alberta, Canada. Various arts and crafts and food vendors set up booths.

The 2016-17 Red Mountain Eagle Pow-Wow Princess, Kennise McGertt, was crowned after the grand entry on November 5. McGertt was the First Attendant at last year’s pow-wow. The pageant did not receive any applications this year.

After three decades now, the Red Mountain Eagle Pow-Wow still brings together dancers, singers and visitors. Every year, old friendships are renewed and new ones are made. For all that time, the pow-wow has been preserving Native American culture and traditions.

Click here to view photo gallery.